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Féilr na gCloch: The Festival of Stone on Inish Oírr

From 14th to 17th September this year, the annual festival of stone, Féile na gCloch, took place on Inis Oírr. The theme this year: Lámha trasna na hEorpa, Hands Across Europe represented the cultural exchange between participants from around the world. During the course of the four day festival, representatives from dry stone construction communities met to exchange knowledge and celebrate the craftsmanship, heritage, and the timeless beauty of stone work that can be found on Inis Oírr, various parts of Ireland and around the world. The Art of Dry Stone Construction, Knowledge and Techniques was officially inscribed on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2018. Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland were included in this initial inscription. In March 2023 an application was submitted to UNESCO seeking to add Ireland, Austria, Andorra, Belgium and Luxembourg to the inscription. UNESCO’s decision on this application is expected in December 2024. To mark this application to UNESCO and further support international partnership and knowledge sharing, Ireland invited representatives from each of the countries involved in the inscription to attend Féile na gCloch 2023. As part of the festival programme, whilst also immersing themselves in island culture, the international delegation gave talks and presentations as well as participated in building an International wall. Interesting information on dry stone construction was shared including ongoing projects and initiatives around this millennia-old practice, framed by workshops on dry stone walling; letter and stone carving; hot lime mortar mixing and application; and sketching. The fast programme of events reflected the versatility of this important intangible cultural heritage tradition. The exhibition ‘Lámha trasna na hEorpa’ (Hands Across Europe) was also launched during the festival. This exhibition showcased the rich traditional artistry of drystone construction in Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Luxembourg, Slovenia and Spain. 2023 also marks the 20th Anniversary of the UNESCO 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. Ireland ratified this Convention in 2015 and officially launched its inaugral National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2019, which to date compries 38 elements of Ireland’s living heritage. Ireland has also been successful in having four ICH practices inscribed on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity; Uilleann Piping in 2017, Hurling in 2018, Irish Harping in 2019; and Irish Falconry in 2021. The Sustainability of Dry Stone Construction Aside from the value this practice brings to culture and heritage across Europe, dry stone walling is a sustainable way to build without harming natural ecosystems in the vincinity of construction. The sustainability of dry stone walling can be explained in two parts: through the perspective of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by looking at how the event promoted the preservation of this craft and the positive effects it had on the local island community; and from the delegates themselves each explaining the idiosyncratic ways dry stone walling mitigates affects of climate change, and promotes sustainability in their regions. Fullfilling the Sustainable Development Goals Even though the act of drying stone walling in and of itself is sustainable, Féile na gCloch promotes sustainability in its own way and aligns with 6 out of a total of 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals as outlined by the United Nations: Goal 4: Quality Education - Féile na gCloch Inis Oírr promotes traditional skills such as dry stone walling, letter carving, stone carving, and sketching through workshops and educational activities. By providing training and education in these traditional crafts, it helps preserve our cultural heritage and pass on valuable skills to future generations. Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth - By providing workshops and training in stonerelated crafts, Féile na gCloch Inis Oírr supports the local economy by offering employment and income opportunities for artisans and crafts people. It promotes sustainable economic growth by supporting local businesses and preserving traditional skills that contribute to the cultural heritage of the community. Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure - Dry stone walling, stone carving and letter carving can contribute to promoting the use of traditional building materials and techniques, supporting sustainable infrastructure development. This can be particularly relevant in preserving historical buildings and cultural heritage sites. Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities - Féile na gCloch aims to promote sustainable development in the local community of Inis Oírr by promoting traditional building techniques such as dry stone walling, the use of hot lime, stone carving and letter carving. By using sustainable techniques and materials, these activities contribute to the preservation of the natural environment and the cultural landscape of the island and creates a more resilient and sustainable community. Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production - As an event focused on traditional crafts and skills, Féile na gCloch, Inis Oírr promotes responsible consumption and production by encouraging the use of local and sustainable materials. Drystone walling and stone carving prioritises the use of locally sourced materials and traditional techniques, promoting sustainable production and reducing environmental impacts. The use of hot lime demonstrations also highlights sustainable building practices and the importance of minimizing carbon emissions. By promoting the use of such materials, it reduces the environmental impact associated with other less sustainable construction materials. Goal 13: Climate Action - Féile na gCloch supports climate action through its workshops on using traditional techniques like drystone walling and hot lime demonstrations which can help to promote the use of sustainable building materials and low-carbon construction practices and contributes to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Overall, Féile na gCloch aligns with several sustainable development goals by: Promoting and preserving traditional craftsmanship by providing training opportunities and supporting local artisans and cultural heritage. Raising awareness about the importance of sustainable materials and techniques in construction. Encouraging the adoption of traditional methods in the restoration and conservation of historic buildings, structures and sites. Collaborating with local communities, organisations, and policymakers to integrate these practices into sustainable development plans. Sustainability Country by Country Austria From Austria, Helmut Schieder and Rainer Vogler...

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Féile na gCloch (Festival of Stone) 14th – 17th September 2023

Féile na gCloch (Festival of Stone) was established in 2006 and takes place each year on the beautiful island of Inis Oírr. The Festival celebrates the craftsmanship, heritage, and the timeless beauty of stone work that can be found on Inis Oírr, various parts of Ireland and throughout the world. The festival includes many workshops such as dry stone walling, stone carving, lettering, sketching and working with hot lime mortar. It also provides an opportunity for dry stone communities, crafts people and enthusiasts alike to come together and exchange knowledge which in turn assists in the safeguarding of this important element of our intangible cultural heritage. The Art of dry stone walling, knowledge and techniques was officially inscribed on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2018. Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland were included in this initial inscription. In March 2023 an application was submitted to UNESCO seeking to add Ireland, Austria, Andorra, Belgium and Luxembourg to the inscription. UNESCO’s decision on this application is expected in December 2024. To mark this application to UNESCO and further support international partnership and knowledge sharing, Ireland has invited representatives from each of the countries involved in the inscription to attend Féile na gCloch 2023. The international delegation will give talks and presentations during the festival and participate in the building an ‘International Wall’. The exhibition ‘Lámha trasna na hEorpa’ (Hands Across Europe) will also be on display during the festival. This exhibition showcases the rich traditional artistry of drystone construction in Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Luxembourg, Slovenia and Spain. Further information on Féile na gCloch (Festival of Stone) can be found at: https://heritage.galwaycommunityheritage.org/content/category/topics/feile-na-gcloch The inscription of Art of dry stone walling, knowledge and techniques on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity can be viewed at: https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/art-of-dry-stone-walling-knowledge-and-techniques-01393

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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the UNESCO 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

Taking place from 12th to 20th August and focusing on the theme of ‘Living Heritage’, this year’s National Heritage Week is sure to be an exciting week full of opportunities to explore our traditions, practices, knowledge and skills. Visit the National Heritage Week website to see what events are happening near you that help promote and safeguard Ireland’s intangible cultural heritage. 20th Anniversary of the UNESCO 2003 Convention This year also marks the 20th Anniversary of the establishment of the UNESCO 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. The Convention was adopted on 17th October 2003 by the 32nd session of the General Conference of UNESCO, and expanded the concept of cultural heritage to include intangible cultural heritage and highlighted the importance of safeguarding it at international level. The purpose of the Convention is  to safeguard intangible cultural heritage;  to ensure respect for the intangible cultural heritage of the communities, groups and individuals concerned;  to raise awareness at the local, national and international levels of its’ importance; ensuring mutual appreciation thereof; and,  to provide for international cooperation and assistance. Throughout this celebratory year, UNESCO will host meetings and events to mark the occasion and reflect on the impacts this Convention has had over the past two decades while using the opportunity to further highlight the importance of safeguarding our living heritage. For further information, please click here. What is Intangible Cultural Heritage? Intangible cultural heritage is defined in the 2003 UNESCO Convention as referring to the practices, expressions, knowledge and skills that communities and groups recognise as part of their cultural heritage. It is passed from generation to generation and is recognised under one or more of the following categories: • Oral traditions and expressions; • Performing arts; • Social practices, rituals and festive events; • Knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe; and • Traditional craftsmanship. Ireland’s National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage In December 2015, Ireland ratified this 2003 UNESCO Convention. Ireland’s National Inventory for Intangible Cultural Heritage was launched in 2019 with the aim to protect, promote and celebrate Irish living cultural heritage practices, customs, crafts and traditions, locally, nationally, and internationally. To date, 38 elements of Ireland’s living heritage have been inscribed. Applications to the National Inventory continue to be accepted on an ongoing basis. The applications are assessed by an Expert Advisory Committee who consider whether the nominated element is an example of Intangible Cultural Heritage (as defined in the 2003 Convention), as well as whether there is adequate community support & engagement for the element and whether the nominated element is passed from generation to generation. The Committee then provide their recommendations to the Minister of Culture. UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity Successful applicants to the National Inventory may also be put forward by the State for inscription on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, to which the State is entitled to make one nomination every year. To date, Ireland has successfully inscribed four elements of our Intangible Cultural Heritage on the UNESCO Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Uilleann Piping was inscribed in 2017, Hurling in 2018, Irish Harping in 2019 and most recently Falconry in 2021, which joined the existing multinational inscription of Falconry. In March this year an application (led by Ireland) was submitted to UNESCO to include Ireland, Austria, Andorra, Belgium and Luxembourg on the existing Dry Stone Construction inscription on the UNESCO Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. We eagerly await UNESCO’s decision on this application, which is expected in December 2024! By achieving international recognition of these practices, in close cooperation with the communities concerned, their safeguarding is supported for future generations. It also serves to acknowledge and celebrate the work of the generations who have kept these traditions alive and provides a wonderful opportunity to share these cherished aspects of Irish culture with others.

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Safeguarding Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage

Sarah Trimble works in the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media and is based in the International Cultural Policy Unit. One of her key areas of responsibility is Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH), which involves updating the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage (NICH) Website, organising events to help promote and safeguard ICH practices, supporting applicants seeking inscription on the NICH, and coordinating meetings of the Expert Advisory Committee on ICH.     Have you ever stopped and taken a moment to consider all the things important to you that make up your culture, your heritage? What elements are most important to you? Is it a tradition, craft or social practice passed on through your family or community for generations? Or perhaps it is a particular skill or practice that is at risk of being lost if the knowledge is not shared and continued for years to come? These invaluable and in some circumstances at risk practices are often referred to as ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage’ and this post explains how the Department works with many practitioners and organisations to help protect Ireland’s intangible cultural heritage and keep it alive for future generations. Intangible cultural heritage plays an important role in maintaining cultural diversity. Not only does ‘cultural heritage’ include monuments, buildings, structures and objects, it also includes the skills and traditions that are passed down from generation to generation. Inherited from our ancestors and passed down to our descendants, these invaluable pieces of intangible cultural heritage include oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, traditional crafts as well as knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe. It is important to keep these traditions alive through safeguarding efforts and supporting their intergenerational transmission. Otherwise, many elements of Ireland’s intangible cultural heritage could be lost forever. UNESCO 2003 Convention This year marks the 20th Anniversary of the establishment of the UNESCO 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage It is from this convention that we get many of the definitions of what constitutes intangible cultural heritage. For example, Intangible cultural heritage is defined in this convention as referring to the practices, expressions, knowledge and skills that communities and groups recognise as part of their cultural heritage. It is passed from generation to generation and is recognised under one or more of the following categories: • Oral traditions and expressions; • Performing arts; • Social practices, rituals and festive events; • Knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe; and • Traditional craftsmanship. The purpose of the Convention is not just to define what intangible cultural heritage is, but also to safeguard it; to ensure respect for the intangible cultural heritage of the communities, groups and individuals concerned; to raise awareness at the local, national and international levels of its’ importance; ensuring mutual appreciation thereof; and to provide for international cooperation and assistance.   Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage In December 2015 Ireland ratified this 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, with the aim to safeguard, appreciate and raise awareness of Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage. Ireland’s obligations under the 2003 Convention include establishing a National Inventory for Intangible Cultural Heritage to protect, promote and celebrate Irish living cultural heritage practices, customs, crafts and traditions, locally, nationally, and internationally. In 2019 the National Inventory was officially launched by the Minister for Culture and to date has 38 elements of Ireland’s living heritage inscribed. Applications to the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage continue to be accepted by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media on an ongoing basis. The applications are assessed by an Expert Advisory Committee who consider whether the nominated element is an example of Intangible Cultural Heritage (as defined in the 2003 Convention), as well as whether there is adequate community support & engagement for the element and whether the nominated element is passed from generation to generation. The Committee then provide their recommendations to the Minister of Culture. You can find out more about the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage, as well as the Department’s vision, mission and principles for intangible cultural heritage at https://nationalinventoryich.chg.gov.ie/about/ Last year, Ireland submitted its periodic report to UNESCO to outline the legislative, regulatory and other measures untaken for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage. The preparation of Ireland’s report focused on the broad surveying of and engagement with relevant stakeholders and the findings of the report will help inform and guide plans and priorities for safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage over the coming years, while incorporating the Vision, Mission and Principles outlined for ICH in Ireland. Ireland’s Periodic Reports can be downloaded at here. UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity Successful applicants to the National Inventory may also be put forward by the State for inscription on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, to which the State is entitled to make one nomination every year. To date, Ireland has successfully inscribed four elements of our Intangible Cultural Heritage on the UNESCO Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Uilleann Piping was inscribed in 2017, Hurling in 2018, Irish Harping in 2019 and most recently Falconry in 2021, which joined the existing multinational inscription of Falconry. In March this year an application (led by Ireland) was submitted to UNESCO to include Ireland, Austria, Andorra, Belgium and Luxembourg on the existing Dry Stone Construction inscription on the UNESCO Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. We eagerly await UNESCO’s decision on this application, which is expected in December 2024! By achieving international recognition of these practices, in close cooperation with the communities concerned, their safeguarding is supported for future generations. It also serves to acknowledge and celebrate the work of the generations who have kept these traditions alive and provides a wonderful opportunity to share these cherished aspects of Irish culture with others. Promoting and Safeguarding Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage The Department of the Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltact, Sport and Media, alongside the practitioners of intangible cultural heritage and the relevant stakeholders are...

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Living Heritage takes centre stage for this year’s National Heritage Week

National Heritage Week National Heritage Week - an annual celebration of our natural, built and cultural heritage - is currently underway across Ireland, taking place from the 12th to the 20th of August. This year's theme, ‘Living Heritage’, focuses on the rich mosaic of traditional practices, knowledge, arts and skills, that have been passed down from generation to generation, and continue to thrive today. Living Heritage is at the heart of Ireland's cultural identity, with an array of events and activities taking place which showcase the enduring traditions that connect us to our roots. Key events, include: An opportunity to delve into the history of hurling with Professor Paul Rouse of UCD as he explores the history of this beloved national sport as well as the Shinrone hurl, believed to be one of the oldest in Offaly.   The intricate craftsmanship of dry stone walling at Kilskyre, Kells Co. Meath, where a Dry Stone Retaining Wall Project is reaching its completion.   An opportunity to witness the intricate skills of tinsmithing with Traveller tinsmith James Collins at Collins Barracks.   An exploration of the delicate artistry of Limerick Lace at the "Bring out your Lace" event.   The National Print Museum hosting a captivating journey into typography and design at the Strange Type & Odd Sorts event.   Minister of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media, Catherine Martin, expressed enthusiasm for this year's theme, saying: "National Heritage Week provides us all with an opportunity to immerse ourselves in our living heritage. I encourage everyone to take up this opportunity to come together as communities to share, learn, and celebrate the remarkable traditions that shape our lives. From traditional crafts to historical insights, this year's events are a testament to the resilience and continuity of our living heritage."   As part of National Heritage Week – which is coordinated by the Heritage Council - Wild Child Day takes place on Saturday, August 19th, with children invited to unleash their curiosity and sense of adventure through a series of family-friendly events that celebrate the great outdoors, nature, and biodiversity. This day aims to foster a deep connection between the younger generation and the natural world.   Concluding the week on Sunday, August 20th, Water Heritage Day pays tribute to water as an integral part of our natural heritage. Enjoy boat tours, embark on river walks, attend marine biodiversity talks, and let your children's creativity flow at captivating workshops.   To explore the full spectrum of National Heritage Week events and activities, visit the official website at heritageweek.ie. The website provides a comprehensive guide to events taking place across Ireland and allows you to filter by county or event type to find experiences that resonate with you.   Additionally, the Department maintains the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage, which catalogues living cultural practices, arts and traditions in Ireland that have received official State recognition through their inscription on the Inventory. More information on these 38 inscribed practices is available here.

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Free Online UNESCO Course on Living Heritage and Sustainable Development

UNESCO has launched a free online course on Living Heritage and Sustainable Development, which is open to anyone with an interest in these areas.   The course is composed of six modules, each consisting of related chapters under a common theme, including an overview of living heritage in the spirit of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage and the relationship between living heritage and topics such as gender, education, health, income generation, agriculture, climate change and peacebuilding.   The course is self-paced, which means that all course components are available and can be completed at any time until 31 August 2022. The course can be accessed for free via the edX website. The video chapters are also available at the SDG Academy library.

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Survey of ICH in Ireland – UNESCO Periodic Report 2021

Survey of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ireland

The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media is conducting a survey of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) in Ireland. The objective of the survey is to obtain a clear picture of the important work undertaken by Ireland’s ICH practitioners and other key stakeholders in the field of ICH. The responses received from the survey will help form the official response to a UNESCO periodic report on ICH in Ireland. The responses will also inform the development and direction of Department policy in respect of ICH over the coming 2-3 years. Below are two surveys – one aimed at State Bodies and the other aimed at Community Groups/Individuals who are involved in Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH). The Department invites you to participate by completing the survey that is relevant to you. Survey for State Bodies Survey for Community Groups/Individuals Please submit your completed survey by the deadline of Friday 3rd December 2021. By email to: nationalich@tcagsm.gov.ie Or By post to: NICH Room 315 Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media, 23 Kildare Street D02 TD30 The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media would like to thank you for taking the time to respond to this survey. Your input is important to us and will help communicate the important work being undertaken in ICH in Ireland and contribute to identifying priority areas in the coming years.

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Projects – National Heritage Week 2020

Intangible Cultural Heritage and Heritage Week 2020   As part of Heritage Week 2020, which takes place on 15 to 23 August, the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht is supporting the delivery of 18 projects to showcase and raise awareness of Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage, giving the public the opportunity to learn about and engage with our rich  and diverse cultural heritage practices. Projects supported include the following practices inscribed on Ireland’s National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage; Film: The Tradition of Boyne Currach making Video: The Craft of Traveller Tinsmithing Video: A brief history of Limerick Lace, 1829 to present Video: The Nine Native Pedigree Dog Breeds of Ireland Live Carillon Recital, Cobh Co. Cork Video: The Art of Dry Stone Walling Video: Holy wells in Co Clare Live Performance of the Mummers play (traditional Fingal version) Video: The Practice of Burren Winterage Video: Irish Crochet Lace Making Video: Irish Traditional Instrumental and Vocal Music, Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann Projects supported also include: Video: Letting In The Light, The Art of the Wood Engraver Livestream: Presentation/Performance of Traditional Sean-nós Song by Lasairfhíona Ní Chonaola Video: Collaborative Performance, Galway Traditional Orchestra and Anxo Lorenzo, Galicia Livestream: Traditional Irish Music Workshop and Cello Workshop with Sharon Howley Video: Log an Aifrinn, Mass Tree and Penal Mass Site Event: Cultural Heritage in South Galway – Then and Now Video: ‘Gob’ fun programme as Gaeilge le Éire agus Chulainn

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Performing, Promoting, and Preserving Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage

  Date: Thursday, August 19, 2021 Location: Zoom Webinar Time: 7pm Duration: 1hr 30 mins What is intangible cultural heritage? Why is it important? How can it be protected? How can digital records of these practices help to pass them down to future generations? A live online event co-organised by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and the Digital Repository of Ireland as part of National Heritage Week 2021 takes place on Thursday 19th August at 7pm via Zoom. Join Manchán Magan online for a lively evening of performance, exploration, and discussion on the theme of intangible cultural heritage. A representative from the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media will speak about the development of the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Practitioners and performers from three performing arts will give insights into their practices and why they are important. The Digital Repository of Ireland will ask us to think about how the preservation of digital records can help to pass practices like these down to future generations. Manchán will then open the floor to questions, as you are invited to join us in recognising and experiencing this important element of Ireland’s cultural heritage. Further details on the event can be found at: https://www.heritageweek.ie/projects/performing-promoting-and-preserving-irelands-intangible-cultural-heritage Recordings of the event can be viewed via DRI’s Vimeo account To read DRI’s blog of the event please follow the link https://dri.ie/heritageweek2021-blog  

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Minister Martin Announces State Recognition of Key Practices of Ireland’s Living Cultural Heritage

  Minister Martin Announces State Recognition of Key Practices of Ireland’s Living Cultural Heritage Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media, Catherine Martin TD, has extended the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage to give State recognition to a further 8 key practices of Ireland’s Living Cultural Heritage. The practices now being recognised are Beekeeping, Clones Crochet Lace Making, Headford Lace Making, Irish Traditional Travelling Circus and Funfair, Lá an Dreoilín/Wren’s Day, Native Irish Cattle Breeding, The Tradition of Spancilhill International Horse Fair, Traditional Seine Boat Building, Fishing and Racing.   Minister Martin said: “These eight living cultural heritage practices require knowledge and skill, and foster our sense of community and place. These practices thrive through the dedicated communities who sustain and pass on their skills and way of life to succeeding generations ensuring the continuance of these important traditions. Official State recognition and inscription onto the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural will raise awareness of these practices and traditions.”   Mr Michael Duggan, speaking on behalf of the Spancilhill Fair Association, commented: “I am delighted that the Tradition of the Spancilhill International Horse Fair will be included as part of the National Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage. I want to thank the Minister that she saw fit to include this tradition that is over 400 years old as part of the recognised cultural heritage of Ireland. We are very proud of the fair, it brings people from all over Ireland and from other countries.” (more…)

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